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Archive for the ‘General Interest’ Category

The photos and stories in the news coming out of Texas and the Gulf Coast – and now from overseas in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal – move us to want to do something for people who find themselves suddenly hungry, homeless, or having lost everything.

But how do we know what will help, or if the help we send will even get there?

Writing a check to a large organization will likely help someone somewhere, though your donation may not go directly to the hardest-hit area or even the most-recently-hit trouble spot.

Speaking as someone whose town was flooded a number of years ago, probably the best lessons I learned from our experience were: (1) connect with people who have feet on the ground locally, work with them, and help provide what they need; (2) listen: listen for specific needs, but mostly listen to the people who are suffering loss and just want a listening ear; (3) big programs don’t really help much – they come and go fast, and many locals don’t qualify for their help. (4) Recovery takes much, much longer than the news cycle. Usually years. Sending help, organizing a work crew, holding drives or fundraisers – may actually be more helpful six months from now when everyone else has moved on to the next crisis.

Here are a couple of excellent articles on the best (and worst) ways to help… recommended reading.

What We Learned from Hurricane Katrina – written by a pastor serving a church in the New Orleans area when Katrina hit

The Wrong Donations – Some Tough Words on Disaster Relief – written by an author currently living and volunteering in Texas

 

 

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While we think about the concerns raised in my previous post, here’s a satiric public-service announcement concerning the naming of new drugs (in case you’re planning on bringing a few to market).  Here in the second decade of the 21st century, drug names MUST:

  • contain three syllables, no more, no less
  • the first syllable may be made up of any randomly-chosen letters. If those letters sound vaguely like something that has something to do with the disease being treated, so much the better, but this is not necessary.
  • the second syllable must contain a hard consonant sound such as “K”, “X”, “CK”, “P”, “T”, or “Q” in order to make the medicine sound strong and effective.
  • the third syllable must end on a soft vowel or vowel-like sound in order to make it sound like it’s gentle on your system.

And the required list of possible side-effects — which may actually be worse than the disease — must be read at the end of the commercial by a summa cum laude graduate of the local auctioneering school.

Herewith are some examples of drug names and their uses, which (not having been copyrighted) are available to any pharmaceutical entrepreneurs:

  • Smelecksa – Temporarily turns off your nose while you carry the trash out
  • Furexie – Prevents cat hair from sticking to your work clothes
  • Notaulska – Prevents strangers from babbling your ear off on the bus or train
  • Denozno – Take before visiting homes with dogs, to keep Fido’s nose a respectable distance away
  • Dorstepo – Prevents salesmen and Jehovah’s Witnesses coming up on your porch
  • Peptoka – I can’t stand the taste of Pepto-Bismol but I need SOMETHING right now!
  • Bunoyza – Stops the car making that weird noise
  • Drugova – Blocks all those annoying drug ads

Feel free to add new drug suggestions of your own!

 

 

 

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In the past year or so I’ve noticed a sharp spike in new drugs being advertised, unlike anything I’ve seen since I was growing up in the early-to-mid 1960s.

Back then a spate of legal mood-altering drugs hit the market, originally designed to help people suffering from psychoses, neuroses, depression, and other legitimate conditions, but which were soon being prescribed for just about anything from nervousness to a hangnail.

Methamphetamines and barbiturates were legal back then, but the problem was very few people really knew what these drugs did, and many were highly addictive.  Stories of overdoses of “uppers” and “downers” began to hit the news on a regular basis.

And many of the drugs were particularly popular among suburban housewives – so much so they inspired a Top 40 hit for the Rolling Stones in 1966 – Mother’s Little Helper:

“Kids are different today, I hear every mother say
Mother needs something today to calm her down
And though she’s not really ill, there’s a little yellow pill
She goes running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
And it helps her on her way, gets her through her busy day…”

I can’t help but wonder if having so many drug commercials on TV is seen as ‘permission’ by recreational drug users to continue to experiment with their bodies – and often lose their lives doing it.

And I can’t help but wonder if many of the drugs hitting the market today will, 50 years from now, be known as amazingly dangerous in the eyes of our great-grandchildren as the uppers and downers of past years seem to us.

 

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Thanks to Facebook friend Ron Lusk for sharing this article from Wired.com:  “The Crisis of Attention Theft: Ads That Steal Your Time for Nothing In Return”

Pull-quote: “…in overstimulated lives, moments do matter, and indeed sometimes few things matter more than a few chosen minutes of silence. The important question is the aggregate effect of all of these various intrusions on both our health and that precious thing known as autonomy.”

I’m old enough to remember a time when ads were not everywhere, all the time. It’s amazing how quiet my childhood memories are: not silent, but filled with the sounds of nature and/or family and neighbors.  TV and radio commercials were limited to a one-or-two-sentence “sponsored by” acknowledgement (the kind of acknowledgement Public TV used to use — they’ve got full-fledged commercials now).

And the generation before mine grew up with nothing more obnoxious than roadside Burma-Shave ads.

Is it a coincidence that, in a time when we are being force-fed ads, and denied so much as an “off” button, we’re also being told what we must believe about politicians, religion, foreign countries, etc? Is it a coincidence that voices of dissent and change — like those found in the Green Party, the American Solidarity Party, or the Jesuits for that matter — are consistently marginalized or ignored?

If you doubt the power and pervasiveness of ads today, try this experiment: see if you can get through an entire day without seeing the words “Xfinity” or “Verizon”.  I tried every day for a month before I admitted failure.

Did you ever agree to give these corporations this much real estate in your mind? I know I didn’t.

The constant 24/7/365 over-stimulation of every person in the Western world can’t be healthy mentally, psychologically, or spiritually.

Awareness is a start.  Next steps?

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From a sermon I heard at the local Ukrainian Orthodox Church earlier today.  This isn’t quite verbatim but it’s how my big-picture brain summed up the details of what the good padre was saying:

“Just as Eve was taken from Adam’s side to be his bride, the church was taken from Jesus’ side to be his bride.”

In the Genesis story, God causes a deep sleep to come over Adam, and takes a rib from his side and forms a wife for him. “This indeed is bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh,” Adam remarks later.

In the Passion story, Jesus enters into the sleep of death, and while he is asleep a spear is thrust into his side to be sure he is dead. His sacrifice, and victory over death, makes possible the body of believers — “the bride of Christ” — who witness his resurrection three days later (and continue to witness to his resurrection).

One day Jesus will look at us and say “this indeed is bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh” and he will delight in us just as Adam and Eve delighted in each other.

If you’ve ever doubted that Jesus loves you…… doubt no longer.

 

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It’s been way too long since I’ve done any blogsurfing. It’s good to be out browsing other people’s work today and exploring the cyber-world out there.

These are in no particular order or category, and all the sites are new to me so I can’t really add much other than to recommend them, so I’ll just say “grab a cuppa and enjoy”.

Bhavna Misrahttps://bhavnamisra.com/ – I love art. I love its beauty and creativity, and the unique way every individual views and expresses the world around them.  This young California-based artist has a real eye for color.

One Bottle, One Glasshttps://onebottleoneglass.wordpress.com/ – Addiction and its heart-rending consequences is all around us these days.  I’m always looking for things that might help reach people who are trapped in addiction.  First-person stories are powerful.  This thirty-something mother of two shares her very personal journey to sobriety.

Wild About Scotlandhttps://wildaboutscotland.com/ – Scotland is breathtaking, and this photographer captures views most tourists never get to see.  Stunning!!

Shopfront Elegyhttps://shopfrontelegy.wordpress.com/ – One of the best pieces of advice an undergrad professor ever gave us was: “when you walk around a city, look up!”  Urban architecture is full of beauty, history, humor, and surprises.  This blog preserves British storefronts – a unique online opportunity to get to know “the real England” and appreciate the vision (or lack thereof) of urban designers.

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Reblogging. Good information from someone who’s been there. The ultimate reason: “They need our help.” Exactly.

I made a video:

I sort of couldn’t help myself. When I lived in Denmark I volunteered at an asylum center. I mentored a 17-year-old Afghan refugee. Since then, I’ve had friends and colleagues get jobs in international refugee policy. Seen them, one by one, become frustrated at the stinginess, the injustice, the cruelty masquerading as bureaucracy. It’s impossible for me to talk or write about this in my own voice without getting worked up, so I tried using someone else’s.

I grew up in a super religious family. Church on Sundays, hands clasped before dinner, Bible camp every summer. I remember talking to one of my parents’ friends when I was maybe 13 or 14. She worked at a homeless shelter, she provided food and clothes and beds all winter, a big brick building in the middle of a neighborhood I had lived my whole life avoiding.

I was in my Ayn Rand phase at the time, and I…

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